Cheetah on a branch

£450.00

66 x 19 x 31 cm

This piece and my sculpture of a cheetah are heavily inspired by the brilliant work of the South African artist, Dylan Lewis. I think he is an absolute inspiration. These are crafted in Crank clay.

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( Ceramic Cheetah on a branch – CHEET-C-001 )

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SKU: CHEET-C-001 Category: Tags: , ,

Description

Cheetah on a branch

 

Cheetah

 

For more information go to  panthera.org

 

The fastest land animal in the world, the cheetah is a marvel of evolution. The cheetah’s slender, long-legged body is built for speed. Cheetahs are tan in colour with black spots all over their bodies. They can also be distinguished from other big cats by their smaller size, spotted coats, small heads and ears and distinctive “tear stripes” that stretch from the corner of the eye to the side of the nose.

Cheetahs eat mainly gazelles, wildebeest calves, impalas and smaller hoofed animals.When cheetahs are running, they use their tails to help them steer and turn in the direction they want to go, like the rudder of a boat.

In 1900, there were over 100,000 cheetahs across their historic range. Today, an estimated 9,000 to 12,000 cheetahs remain in the wild in Africa. In Iran, there are around 200 cheetahs living in small isolated populations.

Historically cheetahs were found throughout Africa and Asia from South Africa to India. They are now confined to parts of eastern, central and southwestern Africa and a small portion of Iran.

Found mostly in open and partially open savannah, cheetahs rely on tall grasses for camouflage when hunting. They are diurnal (more active in the day) animals and hunt mostly during the late morning or early evening. Only half of the chases, which last from 20 – 60 seconds, are successful.

Cheetahs knock their prey to the ground and kill with a suffocating bite to the neck. They must eat quickly before they lose the kills to other bigger or more aggressive carnivores.

 

Unlike other big cats, cheetahs cannot roar. However, they can purr like domestic cats

Classified as vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), the cheetah has suffered a substantial decline in its historic range due to rampant hunting in the 20th century.

In 1900, there were over 100,000 cheetahs across their historic range. By late 2016-early 2017, the cheetah’s global population had fallen to approximately 7,100 individuals in the wild due to habitat loss, poaching, the illegal pet trade, and conflict with humans, with researchers suggesting that the animal be immediately reclassified as “Endangered” on the IUCN Red List.