Polar Bear walking

£350.00

Unusually for me I used Earthstone ES70 for this Polar Bear, made richer with a Manganese Dioxide wash and glazed eyes

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( Ceramic Polar Bear walking – POLB-C-002 )

Out of stock

SKU: POLB-C-002 Category: Tags: , ,

Description

Polar Bear walking

 

Polar Bears

 

The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) is a carnivorous bear whose native range lies largely within the Arctic. Although most polar bears are born on land, they spend most of their time on the sea ice.

It has evolved to occupy a narrow ecological niche, with many body characteristics adapted for cold temperatures, for moving across snow, ice and open water, and for hunting seals, which make up most of its diet. Their ears and tail are small. However, the feet are very large to distribute load when walking on snow or thin ice and to provide propulsion when swimming; they may measure 30 cm (12 in) across in an adult. The pads of the paws are covered with small, soft papillae (dermal bumps), which provide traction on the ice. The polar bear’s claws are short to grip heavy prey and ice.

Polar bears are superbly insulated by up to 10 cm (4 in) of fat.They overheat at temperatures above 10 °C (50 °F), and are nearly invisible under infrared photography. Polar bear fur consists of a layer of dense underfur and an outer layer of guard hairs, which appear white to tan but are actually transparent. Their skin is black. The polar bear has an extremely well developed sense of smell, being able to detect seals nearly 1.6 km (1 mi) away and buried under 1 m (3 ft) of snow. Its hearing is about as acute as that of a human, and its vision is also good at long distances.

 

When the ice floes break up in the fall, ending the possibility of hunting, pregnant females dig a maternity den. Between November and February, cubs are born blind, covered with a light down fur, and weighing less than 0.9 kg (2.0 lb). On average, each litter has two cubs. The family remains in the den until mid-February to mid-April, with the mother maintaining her fast while nursing her cubs on a fat-rich milk. By the time the mother breaks open the entrance to the den, her cubs weigh about 10 to 15 kilograms (22 to 33 lb). For about 12 to 15 days, the family spends time outside the den while remaining in its vicinity, the mother grazing on vegetation while the cubs become used to walking and playing. Then they begin the long walk from the denning area to the sea ice, where the mother can once again catch seals. Depending on the timing of ice-floe breakup in the fall, she may have fasted for up to eight months. During this time, cubs playfully imitate the mother’s hunting methods in preparation for later life.

 

This iconic and beautiful animal is in trouble, many leading polar bear biologists have expressed grave concerns about the impact of climate change, including the belief that the current warming trend imperils the survival of the polar bear.

 

The key danger posed by climate change is malnutrition or starvation due to habitat loss. Polar bears hunt seals from a platform of sea ice. Rising temperatures cause the sea ice to melt earlier in the year, driving the bears to shore before they have built sufficient fat reserves to survive the period of scarce food in the late summer and early fall. Reduction in sea-ice cover also forces bears to swim longer distances, which further depletes their energy stores and occasionally leads to drowning. Thinner sea ice tends to deform more easily, which appears to make it more difficult for polar bears to access seals. Insufficient nourishment leads to lower reproductive rates in adult females and lower survival rates in cubs and juvenile bears, in addition to poorer body condition in bears of all ages